July 13, 2020
Government use of face surveillance technology chills free speech, threatens residents’ privacy, and amplifies historical bias in our criminal system.
Stop bragging about how many megapixels your snazzy new prosumer DSLR camera has – China has beaten you to it. Researchers there have just announced a 500mp camera. Rather than taking stunning vacation photos, though, one of the most likely uses for this wide-angle, beer crate-sized device is for identifying people dozens of meters away using facial recognition.
From hovering drones to hawk-eyed CCTV cameras, Indians by 2020 have become used to being surveilled. Facial recognition, one of the booming, yet controversial technologies, is being harnessed by the Government on a large scale.
The pernicious growth of the surveillance state continues with the imminent rollout of live facial recognition cameras across Britain. That is why this week I signed a statement, alongside a cross-party group of MPs, experts and civil liberties campaigners, calling for a halt to facial recognition trials to give parliament the chance to debate it properly. There is a point at which...
Germany’s Interior Minister Horst Seehofer plans to use automatic facial recognition at 134 railway stations and 14 airports, according to a news report published on 3 January. Although official confirmation of the plan is still missing, an alliance between civil society and politicians has called for the banning of this surveillance technology. EURACTIV Germany reports.
3 billion photos - 1 database for sale to anyone interested - 1 artificial intelligence application - 2.200 police authorities and private companies in 27 countries around the world with access
About 175.000 cameras CCTV are currently installed on Moscow, for security reasons. Of these, over 4.000 cameras are located in central areas of the city and as stated by the mayor of its capital Ρωσίας the 2017, 3.000 cameras have the face recognition technology of the goverment.